Faith-Based Healthcare News – August 2019

Faith-Based Healthcare News – August 2019
20 August 2019 - 10:27, by , in News, Healthcare Articles, Comments off

UNCP, Methodist Work to Create Diversity in Health Care

Methodist University’s Physician Assistant Program has a goal of encouraging diversity in the health professions programs. As a means of achieving this, the Program has entered into an articulation agreement with The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, which promotes American Indians to pursue a PA degree. As reported in The Robesonian, this is seen as “an innovative approach to addressing longstanding health-care challenges in Southeastern North Carolina.”

Houston Methodist Hospital to Anchor Former Chevron Campus

Houston Methodist Hospital signed a lease for 100,812 square feet at the former Chevron Campus in Bellaire, TX, on Houston’s southwest side. RealtyNewsReport shared the health system, which will occupy floors 8, 9 and 10, will be the building’s anchor tenant. The location will serve as administrative office space for the hospital. The move is scheduled to take place in the first quarter of 2020.

Methodist Raises Final Beam on Midlothian Medical Center

Methodist Health System officials gathered with civic and community leaders at a “Topping Out” ceremony to commemorate the halfway point of construction of its new Methodist Midlothian Medical Center. This will be the first hospital in Midlothian, a rapidly growing area in the DFW region, according to Focus Daily News.

How Voice Assistants Will Enhance the Future of Patient Care: Baptist Health CMIO Dr. Brett Oliver

Chief Medical Information Officer at Baptist Health, Brett Oliver, MD discusses how Baptist Health has used technology to improve patient and provider experiences as well as his predictions for what technologies will take off in the healthcare space. Read the complete interview with Becker’s Hospital Review here.

Baptist Health First in Nation to Use New CPR System

Baptist Health Hospital will be the first in the nation to focus on restoring circulation to the brain after a sudden cardiac arrest, according to KARK.com. Utilizing a new device called the EleGARD, which uses a multi-level raising of the head and thorax, improves normal blood flow to the brain, increasing the probability that a patient can return home neurologically intact after having an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

Catholic Healthcare News – August 2019
Adventist Healthcare News – August 2019
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